COMPRESSORS




Impresser


1. Introduction

Impresser was modeled after one of the most flexible, powerful and edgy compressors known to the audio world. Its signature sound is due to a unique analog design and a very special feature set. Impresser offers the best of classic vintage compression while adding a wider range of control options. This vintage unit, now recreated by the powerful Antelope Audio FPGA engine, can handle it all. Impresser can add gentle and warm compression to your tracks or aggressively pump up any source audio.

The flexibility of Impresser is aided by the addition of its own harmonic distortion. This can be used for subtle, tube-quality distortion and even in place of a tape saturator. It works its magic with or without the Impresser compressing the signal. Our own contribution to the effect are the adjustable frequency settings for the High and Band Pass Sidechain Filters. This enables even deeper control when shaping the frequency range for where you need the Impresser to work. Like all Antelope Audio FPGA compressor models, you can use the Impresser either in mono, or with two channels stereo linked.


2. Features

  • Classic sound with modern specs and cutting-edge performance.
  • Three audio modes offer user-programmable, warm harmonic distortion with tube or tape-like saturation.
  • Built-in sidechain EQ with high-pass and band-pass knobs for trimming excess low-end and preventing harsh spikes.
  • Eight different ratios and related compression curves – from 1:1 that gently warms up audio with low-order harmonics to “Nuke”, a cold-blooded brickwall limiter.
  • Stereo Link mode adds additional distortion and musicality.
  • Dedicated circuitry to simulate the sound of classic opto compressors.
  • UK Mode lets you get the distinct sound of an 1176LN with all the buttons pushed in.
  • Easy and intuitive operation.



3. Quick Start

  1. Load the Impresser on the desired audio channel.
  2. Set the ratio to 6:1.
  3. Set the Input, Attack, Release, and Output knobs to midway position.
  4. Adjust the Input knob to drive the compressor harder.
  5. Switch to a higher ratio if you think you need more evident compression.

Note: Cycling through the 1:1 ratio while compressing audio may result in the signal quickly reaching its peak input level and possibly becoming dangerously loud. It is best to skip past the 1:1 ratio setting as quickly as you can, or wait for pauses in the signal while switching ratios.


4. Layout







1. Ratio Button

Cycles between the available compression ratios. The following ratios are available: 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 6:1 10:1, 20:1 and Nuke. Note that 10:1 ratio automatically enables opto compression.

2. Ratio Indicator

Shows the currently selected compression ratio. For example, at a 2:1 ratio, a signal exceeding the threshold by 2 dB will be attenuated down to 1 dB above threshold.

3. Opto Indicator

Lights up when the Impressor works in Opto mode.

4. Sidechain Frequency Knobs

⦁ Sidechain Frequency Knob (High-Pass)
Unlike the hardware original and competing emulations, Impresser offers adjustable frequency settings for the high-pass and band-pass sidechain filters. This knob tweaks the high-pass sidechain filter. Use it to remove excess low-end and prevent the compressor from being triggered by it.

⦁ Sidechain Frequency Knob (Band-Pass)
Unlike the hardware original and competing emulations, Impresser offers adjustable frequency settings for the high-pass and band-pass sidechain filters. This knob tweaks the band-pass sidechain filter. Use it to dial out problematic or harsh frequencies that may stand in the way of proper compression.

5. Bypass Button

Bypasses the Impresser.

6. Harmonics Button

Engages the hardware original’s famous distortion modes. “2nd” mode emphasizes the 2nd harmonic (octave), resulting in a warm and consonant distortion sound. “3rd” mode emphasizes the third harmonic, increases VCA output level, and flattens the signal’s top & bottom peaks. The resulting sound is reminiscent of analog tape saturation.

7. Gain Reduction Meter

Displays the gain reduction (in dB) resulting from compression. The more the LEDs move to the left, the more compression occurs.

8. Clip & Bypass LEDs

⦁ Clip LED
Lights up when clipping occurs as a result of excess signal level.

⦁ Bypass LED
Lights up when the Impresser is bypassed.

9. Input Gain Knob

Not your regular gain knob, this one adjusts the compression threshold in tandem with input gain. The level of threshold modification is related to the ratio setting.

10. Stereo Link Switch & LED

Turns Stereo Link on or off. Although Stereo Link is designed to enable stereo operation with the original hardware, the circuit also colors the sound by changing threshold behavior and elevating harmonic distortion. Give it a try! Likewise, when Stereo Link is switched on, the LED lights up.

11. Attack Knob

Sets the length of time (in microseconds or milliseconds) between the input signal reaching threshold and engaging compression. The Attack times vary from 50 microseconds to 30 milliseconds. Faster attack times make the compressor work more aggressively. The fastest attack time is obtained by setting the knob to 0.

12. UK Mode Switch & LED

Emulates the raucous, hyped-up sound of the famous UREI 1176LN limiter with all four ratio buttons pushed in. UK Mode works with all ratios, but you have to keep the Attack knob set below 3 to preserve the original 1176LN character. Going higher than this raises distortion.

13. Release Knob

Sets the length of time between the signal dropping below threshold and the compressor disengaging. Release times range between 50 microseconds to 3 seconds. The fastest release time is achieved by setting the control to 0.

14. Output Knob

Adjusts the signal level at the output stage of the Impresser, letting you make up lost gain.




5. Ratios Explained

The selectable ratios offer a variety of compression curves, letting you sculpt the sound in perfect harmony with your audio.

1:1
Saturate and warm up your audio without applying compression.

2:1 – 3:1
Gentle compression with +15 to +30dB parabolic-shaped knee.

4:1 – 6:1
This is where you can really hear the Impresser doing its work. A 6:1 ratio with all knobs set midway is the recommended starting point for compressing just about any instrument or vocal.

10:1
Puts the Impresser in Opto mode, engaging dedicated circuitry to emulate the character of classic optical compressors.

20:1 – NUKE
Warning — here be dragons! At these settings, Impresser becomes a hard limiter that’s ready to crush or expand any sound – especially room mics.



6. Distortion Tips

The Impresser distortion modes are designed for subtle analog distortion. Engaging “2nd Harmonics” gives out “Class A” tube-like warmth, producing 2nd-order harmonics when compressing. Likewise, “3rd Harmonics” adds both 2nd and 3rd order harmonics for a sound similar to tape distortion.

To obtain analog tape saturation, set the ratio to 2:1, turn on 3rd Harmonics, and add about 3db of gain reduction. Use fast attack and release times. Try a higher ratio and more gain reduction to emulate over-saturated tape.

Bear in mind that going over 5dB of gain reduction will sound less like tape and more like compression!


7. Starting Points For Different Instruments

Here are some example settings for treating different instruments with the Impresser!

7.1 Vocals – Standard
Ratio: 6:1
Attack: 5
Release: 4
Apply 3dB to 17dB gain reduction

7.2 Vocals – Classic Compression
Ratio: 10:1 (Opto mode)
Attack: 10
Release: 0

7.3 Vocals – Aggressive Compression
Ratio: 6:1
Attack: 2.5 to 3.5
Release: 0 to 2
2nd Harmonics engaged
Apply 17dB to 20dB of gain reduction, which will be felt on louder passages only

7.4 Bass
Ratio: 4:1 to 6:1
Attack: 5
Release: 4
Use fast attack and release times to keep clacking sounds from pumping. Apply liberal gain reduction.
Try Opto mode

7.5 Electric Guitar
Start with a ratio of 6:1 and all knobs at noon. From there, apply fast attack and medium release times to smooth out the pick attack. To get rid of harshness in solos, play with the band-pass filter control to bring forth softer notes and sustain higher notes. Feel free to try Opto mode as well.

7.6 Acoustic Guitar
Ratio: 6:1
Input: 7
Attack: 2
Release: 5
Output: 7

7.7 Piano/Keys
Ratio: 6:1
Input: 5
Attack: 5
Release: 5
Output: 5

Start with these neutral settings, then lower the attack and try slightly increasing the release. Opto mode sounds good on piano, too.

7.8 Drums – Snare, Kicks, Toms
Ratio: 3:1 to 6:1
Input: 6
Attack: 5
Release: 5
Output: 6

⦁ Short release times bring out drum decay.
⦁ If crackling occurs, try longer attack and release times.
⦁ Try Opto mode for kick drums, with Attack on 10 and Release on 0.

7.9 Drums – Room Mics
Ratio: 20:1 or Nuke
Input: 10
Attack: 6
Release: 2.5
Output: 6

For a John Bonham type of larger-than-life sound, try setting Attack to 5, Release to 3, and applying up to 20dB of gain reduction. Feel free to add some grit with the 2nd and 3rd harmonics distortion as well.


8. Emulating Classic Compressors

The versatile architecture of Impresser enables convincing emulation of nearly all classic compressor designs. Here’s how to get Impresser to take on the personalities of some well-known units!

8.1 Opto (LA-2A, LA-3A, LA-4A)
Switch to 10:1 ratio and adjust the Attack to 10, Release to 0, Input and Output to taste. Attack settings above 4 keep the opto feel. Faster attack times provide a more aggressive sound. Adding 2nd and 3rd Harmonics to the concoction gives out a tube-like character.

8.2 Over E-Z Type Sound
Set ratio between 2:1 to 6:1, Attack to 9, Release to 2. Don’t use distortion.

8.3 1176LN Feel
Set the ratio between 3:1, 4:1. 6:1, and 20:1 to simulate the 1176LN’s original four ratios. Set the Attack 0 to 3.5, Release 1 to 10.5, and don’t use distortion. Keep the Attack below 4, as the 1176LN has extremely fast attack times.

8.4 Fairchild IGFET
Set ratio to 6:1, Attack between 3 and 5, Release between 2 to 7. Keeping Attack and Release at 4 is a good starting point.


9. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.

Opto (optical) Compression: The main influence over how a compressor sounds is the gain control element. This can be a tube, a FET (field effect transistor), a VCA (voltage-controlled amplifier), a digital processor, or an optical photocell (a light source and light detector). Opto compressors are based on the latter. A typical characteristic of theirs is non-linearity, which results in a very distinct sonic character.

Thus, transparent compression is not usually their forte – although there are modern designs that come close to VCA compressors’ precision. But that’s certainly not what the Opto mode on the Impresser is going after! Rather, it nails the larger-than-life sound of classic opto compressors like the LA-2A, 3-A, and 4-A. You can hear these on countless records, often used to add presence and warmth to vocals.
















Powergate


1. Introduction

PowerGate is the very first Antelope Audio noise gate tool. Requested by our trusted users, it is available with all our Thunderbolt & USB or HD interfaces for free. PowerGate allows you to track audio from sources with unwanted background or ground noise. It will keep your sound free of any artifacts, such as bad resonances, bleeds from other sources, or excessive sustain. PowerGate features a standard set of controls, such as Threshold, Attack, Hold, Decay, Range, and Gain. They let you adapt the effect to any kind of sound.


2. Features

  • Precise controls for Threshold, Attack, Hold, Decay, Range, and Gain.
  • Visualizer for Threshold, Range, and Gain.
  • Transparent sound


3. Layout




1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns On or bypasses the effect. The switch doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. Threshold & Range Knobs

This pair of knobs set the Threshold and Range of the noise gate, respectively. Both parameters are visualized on the display.

Range is the part of the audio signal that is being attenuated. For example, if you set the range at 50, when the gate closes, half of the signal volume will remain.

3. Attack & Decay Knobs

This pair of knobs set the Attack and Decay of the noise gate, respectively.

The Attack control adjusts the length of time between the signal reaching the threshold and the noise gate clamping down on it.

The Decay control specifies how quickly the gate closes – in other words, whether the signal should fade out over time or be abruptly silenced. A zero setting means the signal will jump from the threshold level to silence. Higher settings fade out over the specified time period.

4. Hold & Gain Knobs

This pair of knobs set the Hold and Gain of the noise gate, respectively. The Gain parameter is visualized on the display.

The Hold control adjusts how long the gate will take to close once the Close Threshold has been reached. After the hold time is elapsed, if the signal level did not return above the Open Threshold, the gate starts to close at the speed set by the Decay control.
The Gain control lets you make up for lost gain due to noise reduction.

5. Display

The display visualizes the Threshold, Range, and Gain parameters.

6. Output Level Meter

Visualizes the noise gate output level.




 








Tubechild 670


1. Introduction

Modeled after a legendary 1950s compressor, Tubechild670 gives you nothing less than the sound of the golden age of rock’n’roll. An expensive collectors item, the hardware original has been sought after and used by more studios and on more hit records that you can ever imagine. And now, thanks to our real-time FPGA modeling platform, this coveted tool is in your hands — for free.

Tubechild670 is a precise peak limiter that sounds thick and natural. It gives you control over the Input and Output Gain levels, the Threshold and the Time Constant. We owe its signature sounds to a very smart and simplistic circuitry design, short attack, and long release time. The Tubechild 670 is guaranteed to help vocals and leads shine in the mix, but also works its magic on drums and sounds spectacular when applied for “gluing” groups of instruments. It’s very subtle in terms of adding its own character to the overall sound, but you can’t mistake a Tubechild670-treated track as it just sounds so great!



2. Features

  • Classic valve compressor used in recording sessions by the Beatles and countless artists
  • Pristine sound devoid of audible thumps, distortion and noise.
  • Extremely fast attack time — Tubechild 670 can engage in compression and limiting during the first 10,000ths of a second.
  • Six different timing curves make for a variable release time, allowing for severe limiting that’s virtually imperceptible.
  • Functions both as a compressor and limiter, or anywhere in-between.


3. Quick Start

  1. Load Tubechild 670 on the desired audio channel.
  2. Set Input Gain to 10 (that’s unity gain).
  3. Set Time Constant to 3. *
  4. Turn the Threshold control clockwise or counterclockwise until a desired amount of limiting or output level is achieved.

* This is a general purpose starting point. Positions 1 and 2 are recommended for uptempo music or speech. Position 4 is suggested for classical music. Positions 5 and 6 combine fast release with slow release and are useful for great amounts of automatic level corrections. They also make limiting the least audible as they reduce overall level.



4. Layout







1. VU Meter

Shows the gain reduction occurring as a result of compression or limiting.

2. Power On/Off Switch

Used to bypass the compressor. Acts the same as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

3. Input Gain Control

Adjusts input gain in 1db step increments.

4. Threshold Control

Adjusts the compressor threshold. Continuously variable (non-stepped).

5. Time Constant Switch

Has 6 positions. Controls the Tubechild 670 Attack and Release times as listed in Specifications.

6. Output Gain Control

Adjusts output gain. Used to dial back in the gain lost as a result of compression or limiting.


5. Interesting Facts

  • The original hardware unit uses only a single push-pull stage of audio amplification and an extremely high control voltage. Thus, the Automatic Gain-Controlled Amplifier does not produce audible or observable thumps.
  • The Tubechild 670 Attack time is extremely fast in order to catch short transients. Likewise, the release time is adjustable from 0.3 seconds to 25 seconds in six steps.
  • The compressor can be inserted into any channel strip and set at unity gain with no limiting action. You will probably end up liking its effect on audio quality!
  • Turning the Threshold control fully counterclockwise completely removes the limiting action, turning the Tubechild 670 into a Unity Gain Line Amplifier.


6. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.












SMT 100A


1. Introduction

A 1980s classic, the SMT-100A is among the easiest compressor effects to learn. Yet, this ease of use doesn’t come at the cost of effectiveness or sound! For over 30 years now, this unit has remained a top choice by the pros for its fast attack times and its ability to do a great job with vocals, drums, and bass. For its FPGA-driven replica, we worked hard to painstakingly preserve both the special sound of the SMT-100A and its simplistic design and control set. This way, you can focus on getting the sound you want quickly, without much of a learning curve.


2. Features

  • Easy to use vintage compressor
  • Soft Knee characteristic for smooth compression
  • Thick and warm sound
  • Attack and Release settings selectable via switches

3. Layout








1. 

Attack Switch

Switches between slow, medium or fast attack times, controlling the time it takes for the compressor to respond to the input signal.


2. 

Release Switch

Switches between slow, medium or fast release times. The slower the release, the more release time gets determined by the input signal.


3. Gain Knob

Determines the output level of the compressor.


4. 

Gain Reduction Meter

Used for monitoring the gain reduction occuring as the result of compression.


5.

Gain Reduction Knob

Sets the amount of gain reduction. The higher it is, the higher the ratio becomes.


6.

Power Switch & Diode

Used to bypass the compressor. The diode lights up when the SMT-100A is in Bypass mode.


7.

Output Meter

Monitors output signal level.


4. Usage Tips

⦁ As Gain Reduction is increased your audio will be treated with a smooth compression curve and the compression ratio will be changed. Use this knob to control the amount and type of compression, letting your ears be the judge.
⦁ Upon detecting a large peak the SMT-100A will automatically increase the compression ratio to keep the audio in control.
⦁ For higher amounts of compression, adjust the Gain Reduction knob until a high amount of gain reduction is visible on the meter. Try different Attack and Release settings, depending on the sound that you are after.
⦁ For lower amounts of compression simply adjust the Gain Reduction knob until the meter indicates a small amount of gain reduction is occuring.



5. Interesting Facts

  • The original hardware compressor features a vacuum tube amplifier driving an electronically balanced 990 output stage. All the signal amplification in the audio path takes place in the tube circuit. The 990 is a high performance op-amp made of discrete parts and then potted for thermal stability.
  • The compressor’s input is electronically balanced and directly feeds the unique compression cell.





6. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.











BA-6A

1. Introduction

BA-6A follows the original simple, beautiful, and effective design of a 1950s limiting amplifier. Although it was originally created for TV and radio broadcasting purposes, the BA-6A was quickly adopted by many recording engineers because it was easy to use and sounded so great. Even today, the BA-6A not only holds up, but is still sought after and used in various pro studio facilities across the globe.

Boasting three-stage amplification with a moderate drive, hard knee, fast attack and medium release, the BA-6A offers a balanced and vintage sound. It can help you tame the most aggressive and peaking instruments or the wildest mixes without losing any of the music’s punch.


2. Features

  • Balanced, three-stage limiting amplifier.
  • Prevents over-modulation or overloading.
  • No appreciable increase in harmonic distortion.


3. Layout




1. Input Gain Knob

Adjusts input gain between +12dB to -24dB.

2. Power On/Off Knob

Turns the original hardware On or Off. Here, it’s used for bypassing the effect.

3. Gain Reduction Meter

Shows the gain reduction (in dB) occuring as the result of compression.

4. Mode Knob

Selects a filter with either a single or dial-time constant. In the “single” position, the attack time is 0.0006 seconds. In the “dual” position, the recovery time is lengthened to 2 seconds on sustained peaks.

5. Output Gain Knob

Adjusts output gain between 0 – 30dB.


The BA-6A very much sounds like itself. There’s not much opportunity to shape the sound in critical detail. What it lacks in flexibility, the compressor certainly makes up for with its warm, thick sound full of vintage character. Simply run your audio through it, back off on the output a bit to avoid thumping, and experiment with the Input and Mode knobs until you like the result. Use the BA-6A on vocals, bass guitar, or on the master channel. It will also sound fantastic on acoustic guitars, drums, and anything else in need of a good fattening-up.


4. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.


















Grove Hill Liverpool

1. Introduction

Grove Hill Liverpool is a contemporary fusion of 1960s’ finest American and British compression technologies. This compressor sounds rich, wide and thick. Run acoustic guitars through it and you’ll hear them as clear as possible, yet with a more full-bodied sound and soul.

A great mid-range healer, Liverpool will add a desirable smoothness to guitar leads, synths and vocals. When applied to bass it will achieve a big and warm sound. Push it harder and you’ll add an edge without affecting clarity. Liverpool is an amazing tool that’s quite unlike other compressors! See for yourself.


2. Features

  • All-tube feedback style compressor from the 1960s
  • Based on a dual-triode, remote cut-off Mu tube for gain reduction, re-biased by a 6AL5 vacuum tube.
  • Faithfully recreated solid state power supply provides low noise and stability, even at 30dB (maximum) of gain reduction.
  • A wide range of input signals can be handled without introducing harmonic distortion.
  • Can be used for achieving musically pleasant distortion without applying compression.



3. Layout









1. Input Gain Knob

Unlike many other compressors, this control here plays two roles. It is used both for adjusting input level and to specify the desired average compression as indicated by the gain reduction meter.


2. Threshold Knob

Again, there are two functions to this knob. Its primary purpose is determining the output level at which compression commences. Secondary, it adjusts the ratio.


3. Attack Knob

The Attack Knob controls how much of the signal transient is allowed through before compression starts. There are 6 different speeds, labeled 1 (Fast) to 6 (Slow), with every second selection labeled ‘C’ — for turning off the compression. In these positions, the effect can be used as a line amplifier.


4. Gain Reduction Meter

Used for measuring the gain reduction which occurs as the result of compression.

5. Recovery Knob

The recovery control determines how quickly the signal rebounds after the input signal has fallen below the threshold. There are six Recovery positions labeled 1 (Fast) to 6 (Slow), with every second selection (labeled H) turning on the Hold function.

The Hold function is a unique feature of the Liverpool. It was added as a modification of the original compressor based on feedback from recording engineers. The Hold function is explained in more detail later in this manual.

6. Output Gain Knob

The output attenuator of the Liverpool is controlled from a six-position rotary switch. This method of attenuation allows for constant impedance on the output transformer as well as the load. The available choices are: 0dB, 5 dB, 10dB, 15dB, 20dB, and 30dB.

7.Mains Power On/Off Switch

In the hardware original, the power switch is used to turn the compressor On or Off. Here, it is used for bypassing the effect.



4. Hold Function Explained

When trying to process the initial attack of an audio track, the slow attack of the compressor will cause an audible thump to be produced. In such cases, the Hold function is used to “prime” the compressor with the required amount of gain reduction first, thus preventing the thump from occurring.

This is done by playing a track into the compressor, setting the controls as required, then moving the Recovery control to one of the Hold positions. This prevents the compressor release from taking place, maintaining the amount of gain reduction.

The track can then be stopped and played from the beginning. Once the initial attack of the first note has been processed, the compressor can be switched out of Hold and put back to the desired Recovery setting.

If the unit is compressing a track with room ambience, the ambient noise from the recording would swell up in volume at the end of the performance as the gain reduction returned from the compressed level to zero.

This can be avoided by switching the Recovery control to an adjacent Hold position after the last note has finished, which would stop the compressor release from taking place.


5. Interesting Facts

  • The original hardware is based on a Mu tube — an all-glass, miniature VHF, dual-triode, remote cut-off tube used for gain reduction. This tube is re-biased by a 6AL5 vacuum tube-rectified, side-chain control voltage, which causes the Mu tube to smoothly change its mutual conductance.
  • The benefit of utilizing a variable mutual conductance vacuum tube as the ‘heart’ of the compression is that a variety of input signals can be handled without introducing harmonic distortion.
  • The input control on the LIVERPOOL is located before the tubes and directly after the input transformer. As you advance the input control, you are hitting the input tube at the gain reduction stage with more signal. The signal is then amplified by the second stage.
  • Distortion can be creatively used by turning up the Input Gain Knob and turning down the Output Gain Knob while applying very little or no compression.


6. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.
















FET-A78



1. Introduction

If you need some punchy, classic-style compression, the FET-A78 is definitely among your top choices. Its sound can be found on a huge number of your favorite pop and rock records, as it acts great for processing both instruments and full mixes. The FET-A78 is incredibly flexible, too, so don’t hesitate to treat drums, guitars, vocals, or anything else with it. The limiter also won’t disappoint while working on a group of instruments, such as backing vox, overheads, or crazy synth layers. You can use the FET-A78 in Stereo mode to treat Stereo tracks, apply it on overly dynamic bass lines to make them behave themselves in the mix, and so much more!



2. Features

  • Classic compressor & limiter used on countless records.
  • Highly versatile operation, good for various instruments, vocals, and entire mixes.
  • Extremely slow to extremely fast Attack & Release times.
  • Simple and intuitive operation.


3. Layout







1. Power On/Off Switch & LED

When it’s turned on, the effect is bypassed and the LED lights up.

2. Input Knob

Adjusts input gain.

3. Output Knob

Adjusts output (make-up) gain.

4. Attack Knob

Adjusts the compressor Attack time — the length of time between the input signal reaching the compression threshold and commencing compression. Ranges between 20 microseconds to 800 microseconds.

5. Release Knob

Adjusts the compressor Release time – the length of time between the signal dropping below the compression threshold and the compressor returning to 1:1 ratio. Ranges between 50 milliseconds to 1.1 seconds.

6. Gain Reduction Meter

Monitors the gain reduction occuring as the result of compression.

7. Ratio Buttons

Select the compressor ratio. The choices are: 4:1, 8:1, 12:1, 20:1. Holding Ctrl on Windows (Command on Mac) and clicking lets you “push” all the buttons in, emulating the famous “all-buttons-in”/UK Mode sound of UREI limiters.

8. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.



4. Functionality Explained

Following are explanations and tips regarding the FET-A78 controls and operation.


4.1 Ratios 

⦁ With the FET-78, ratios up to 8:1 achieve a moderate form of gain reduction where the dynamic range is controlled without obvious alteration. The average signal level is incrased and the softer passages become louder.

⦁ Ratios from 12:1 to 20:1 push the FET-78 into limiting. The dynamic range is significantly reduced and high-level peaks are minimized. The output signal cannot exceed a preset level due to practical considerations.


4.2 Treshold

⦁ The relationship of the average input level and the threshold determines the amount of gain reduction and how much of the signal envelope is affected by the limiter action.

⦁ The 1178 allows raising the signal level without introducing distortion.

⦁ Adjusting the input gain so that the average signal level is consistently above the threshold means the entire signal will be compressed.


4.3 Attack Time

⦁ While mixing or mastering, start with the Attack knob set to noon and experiment with different settings to find the best one for your material.

⦁ Choose a fast attack time for material with fast transients and high frequencies with large peak-to-peak amplitudes. This way, potential overshoots and overload problems are kept minimal.

⦁ Limiting with a fast attack time will alter the musical quality of some instruments with a characteristically sharp percussive attack.

⦁ Slow attack times let the initial transients of instruments with fast amplitude changes pass through unaffected. This maintains the punch of percussive-sounding instruments like drums, bass, piano, and guitar at the cost of some amplitude control.


4.4 Release Time

⦁ A good starting point for both individual instruments and mixing or mastering purposes is half-rotation (setting the knob to noon).

⦁ The best practice for adjusting Release Time is to strive for a quick response of the FET-A78 to dynamic changes of the signal while avoiding unwanted “pumping” and “breathing” effects.

⦁ With very short release times, the FET-A78 will return the gain reduction to 0 dB every time the signal drops below the threshold. This can happen between cycles of individual notes and beats — the gain comes up each time, along with the softer passages or the background noise.

⦁ Warning — extremely short release times may introduce harmonic distortion if the gain reduction changes between cycles.

⦁ Very long release times maintain the initial gain reduction caused by large amplitudes, but the dynamic range of the following passages gets strongly affected. If the gain reduction continues through a soft program section, this section may be made inaudible because of the gain reduction. Furthermore, short dynamic changes will be ignored due to the continuous gain reduction.


4.4 Limiter

USING THE FET-A78 ON FULL MIXES AS A LIMITER

⦁ When using the FET-A78 as a limiter, its effect is made most apparent on full mixes. As always, it is important to dial in the appropriate Attack and Release times for optimal results.

⦁ For live recordings, use a slower attack time to maintain a high average level.

⦁ For material with relatively little low frequency content, use a fast release time to increase the short interval average level. The highest apparent average level may be achieved with the shortest release time before overt “pumping” occurs.

⦁ For material with above average low frequency content, the release time should be increased until no low frequency distortion is apparent. Another option is slightly reducing the amount of limiting in favor of slightly faster release time — obtaining a higher average level as a result.

⦁ Adjusting the Attack time also affects the amount of sibilance. Be careful with extremely slow attack times, they may result in full gain being applied to the sibilants and reduced gain to the vowels, ending up with exaggerated sibilants as a result.

⦁ You are encouraged to experiment until you find appropriate settings that work for your material.


5. Glossary

Attack: Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.

Release: Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.

Ratio: Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.

Threshold: The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.

Knee: Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.













ALT-436C


1. Introduction

Modeled after another late 1950s legend, the ALT-436C is an iconic single channel, vari-MU tube compressor with fixed attack times. Being the third revision of a compressors series, which were heavily modded by sound engineers working on pop records of the era, the ALT-436C has added Threshold and Release Time controls. Loved by producers in the Beatles era, this initially inexpensive and now legendary unit is extremely helpful for bass guitars, vocals, string instruments, and even synths! Back in the day pop music wasn’t so cold and sterile, and this unit is one of the reasons why. Explore it thanks to the Antelope Audio FPGA technology!


2. Features

  • Up to 30 dB of thump-free gain reduction.
  • Maintains uniform level of reproduced sound.
  • Preserves optimum dynamic range.
  • Does not cause overmodulation.




3. Layout




1. Volume Control Knob

Adjust the input level to provide the desired average compression as indicated on the Compression Meter.

2. Release Time Control Knob

Controls the length of time between the signal falling below the compression threshold and the compressor returning to 1:1 ratio (effectively stopping compression). Adjustable between 0.3 seconds to 1.3 seconds.

3. Compression Meter

Displays the compression amount in dB.


4. Threshold Knob Control

Adjusts the output level at which compression commences, as well as the compression ratio. Here are some examples:

  • At maximum clockwise position, compression starts at approximately 16dBm output level. Increasing the output level by 20dB at this point results in a 5dB output level increase, thus giving a 4:1 compression ratio. At this setting, maximum compression before distortion is 22dB.
  • In the maximum counter-clockwise position, compression starts at zero level. An 20dB increase in input level results in an output level increase of 10dB, making for a 2:1 compression ratio.



4. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.
Vari-MU
Also known as “variable gain” and probably the earliest compressor design in existence, Vari-MU is a registered trademark of Manley. The technology works by constantly re-biasing a vacuum tube, smoothly changing its gain to achieve compression. This technique is also at the core of the Tubechild 670 model.















Stay-Levin




1. Introduction

Simple design and controls, epic looks, massive sound. Stay-Levin is a unit that shaped the sound of the US 1960s classics. Without a doubt carrying a character and color of its own, it recreates a valve compressor legend that will add a desired analog edge to your contemporary production. Its simple front panel set of controls, featuring only two knobs and two switches, can result in a surprisingly varying compression styles, which can enhance vocals, acoustic guitars and synth leads. Treat your bass and drums with it and they’ll grow bigger and meaner. Vintage compression at its finest, recreated in the FPGA domain for real-time FX perfection.


2. Layout







1. Input Gain Control

Adjusts the input gain.

2. Recovery Time Control

Switches between Slow to Fast recovery (release) times.


3. Mode Switch

Switches between Single and Double recovery times mode.

4. Gain Reduction Meter

Visualises the gain reduction occurring as the result of compression.

5. Power On/Off Switch & Diode

Bypasses the compressor. The diode lights up when the compressor is On.

6. Output Gain Control

Adjusts output gain.



3. Quick Start & Usage Tips

  1. Get a -10dB to -12dB signal from your microphone going into your computer.
  2. Adjust input gain until the meter is reading around 15 on peaks.
  3. With the compression meter peaking on 15, adjust the output gain control until you have a satisfactory signal level.

Different types of musical content require different recovery times. That’s why Stay-Levin has a switch marked “Double” and “Single” for changing the recovery time. In the Single position, the recovery time is fixed and does not change much with occasional short peaks or steady re-occurring peaks. It is best used on classical music or material requiring the most dynamic range. For speech and most popular music, it is best to use the Double recovery time position.
The Attack times in the different positions are as follows: 75 milliseconds for Single and 25 milliseconds for Double.


4. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.















VCA160


1. Introduction

VCA160 combines classic sound, perfect metering and ease of use. Suitable for both “brick wall” limiting and subtle pushing, the hardware original has been carefully modeled to preserve its distinct character in both bad-ass hard knee or gentle low ratio compression. This fast and firm VCA-style compressor is great for controlling vocals, bass guitar or individual drums. When used with aggressive transient sounds, such as kick drums or bass, the VCA160’s fast response can create a classic punch or “thwack”, which has become a unique part of its famously punchy pedigree.



2. Features

  • Continously variable threshold control.
  • Compression control that goes from a ratio of 1:1 to infinity (approximately 120:1).
  • Output control adds up to 20dB of make-up gain.
  • Virtual Gain Reduction Meter for visualization.
  • Easy bypass with the Power button.




3. Layout




1. Power On/Off Button

Turns the compressor On or bypasses the effect. Corresponds to the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. Threshold Control

Adjusts the level above which compression or limiting occurs. When the Below indicator lights up, the compressor input level is below the threshold. When the Above indicator lights up, the input level to the compressor is above the threshold.

3. Compression Control

Adjusts the compression ration from 1:1 (unity gain) to infinity (approximately 120:1 ratio). The compressor becomes a limiter at ratios above 10:1.

4. Output Gain Control

Adjusts the gain of the compressor output stage. The signal can be raised or attenuated by up to 20dB. The control is independent of the Threshold and Compression controls.

5. Gain Reduction Meter

Visualizes the gain reduction that occurs as the result of compression.


4. Quick Start

  1. Turn the threshold control fully clockwise.
  2. Adjust Output Gain to noon (0dB).
  3. Adjust Compression Ratio to an appropriate setting — between 1:1 and 4:1 for compression, from 10:1 to infinity for limiting.
  4. Play the material you are compressing or limiting. Adjust the Threshold counterclockwise until the Above LED starts flickering. At this setting, compression will begin when the input level exceeds the threshold setting. Further counterclockwise rotation will cause compression to start at a lower point relative to the maximum input level.


5. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.












Tube176


1. Introduction

The hardware original behind Tube176 owes its sound to a unique variable-mu dual triode tube which is long out of production. Now this cult studio piece is brought back to life in the FPGA realm as a powerful, fast compressor, which can be used on everything — vocals, guitar solos, bass lines, drums, or even a full mix. Able to smooth the sound or completely flatten it when pushed real hard, Tube176 makes drum transients shine and boosts vocals through a busy mix.


2. Features

  • Quintessential vintage tube compression and limiting.
  • User-friendly controls.
  • Enhances dimension, depth, and detail.
  • Adjusts tone in a way equalization cannot.



3. Layout



1. Input Level Control

As the Tube176 has a fixed threshold, gain reduction is adjusted by the Input Level Control. The input is optimised to provide 0 to 20dB of gain reduction.

2. Compression Ratio Control

Adjusts the compression ratio in four steps, from 2:1 to 12:1. Lower ratios compress audio over a wider dynamic range. Higher compression ratios are better for limiting purposes. The ratio control also changes the threshold. At lesser amounts of gain reduction, lower ratio settings will start compression sooner than higher ratios.

3. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the compressor On or bypasses the effect. Corr

4.Compression Meter

Displays the compression amount in dB.

5. Attack Control

Adjusts the Attack of the compressor. Slow Attack lets more initial transients through. Fast Attack tames peaks and sounds more aggressive.

6. Output Gain Control

Adjusts output gain. Match the Output gain to Input level or make-up lost volume due to gain reduction.

7. Release Control

Adjusts the compressor Release time. Slower settings retain more of the original dynamics. Faster settings add energy and density to the sound.

8. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes the output gain of the compressor.


4. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.














X930



1. Introduction

The X903 is a cult compressor module which will add just the right amount of analog punch needed! Equipped with smart RMS detection, the X903 will treat your sound to high-end, authentic analog compression and limiting. With the X903’s Negative Ratio capabilities, you can even inverse the dynamics of audio material, pulling back the transient peaks for a unique special effect. All in all, the X903 is a natural-sounding compressor capable of managing dynamics in great ways!


2. Features

  • Natural-sounding compression even at relatively large amounts of gain reduction.
  • Infinite and negative compression make unusual special effects possible.
  • RMS detection interprets the signal level as the human ear does for superior compression and limiting.
  • Continuously variable Compression Ratio and Threshold settings.
  • LED Gain Reduction metering.


3. Layout





1. In Button

Activates or bypasses the compressor. If the diode above is lit, the compressor is active. If it’s not, the compressor is bypassed. The In button also doubles as the BP button from the AFX Rack.

2. Threshold Control

Adjusts the sensitivity of the compressor.

3. Ratio Control

Varies the amount of compression from 1:1 (no compression) through to Infinity:1 (infinite compression). You can also go into negative compression ratios, producing inverted dynamics and a sense of “punch”.

4. Output Control

Controls the output gain from -20dB to +20dB.

5. Gain Reduction Meter

The LEDs indicate the amount of compression in dB.


4. Usage Tips

4.1 Threshold

The Threshold control sets the level at which the X903 starts compressing the signal you are processing.

At low compression ratios, a very low threshold setting can gently reduce the overall dynamic range of your audio.
Higher compression ratios coupled with low threshold settings provide levelling for instruments and vocals.

High threshold settings are generally used for limiting. Compression at low threshold settings tends to sound less natural at ratios of 10:1 or greater.

The X903 uses a soft knee at the compression threshold. This means it gradually increases the compression ratio from 1:1 towards the selected ratio as the input signal rises through the threshold region.

With this compressor, the threshold is defined as the point approximately midway between fixed gain and the point at which the curve levels off to the selected compression ratio. At the Infinity:1 setting, the maximum permitted output level is 5dB above threshold with the Output gain set to 0.

4.2 Compression Ratio

A setting of Infinity:1 means the input signal must reach an infinitely high value for a 1dB increase in output level to be produced.

High compression ratios (6:1 or greater) and low threshold settings reduce dynamic range and prevent output signals from substantially exceeding the threshold setting. Low compression ratios (4:1 or lower) affect dynamic range to a lesser degree.

High compression and low threshold are typically used to tighten up the sound of the bass guitar, snare drum, or vocal.

At the extreme clockwise Ratio Control rotation, a -1:1 Output to Input ratio is achieved. This way, the X903 reduces the output level by 1dB for every 1dB that the input signal increases above the Threshold setting. Thus, the X903 output will start rising in level with the input until it begins to approach the Threshold setting.

At this point, output level will begin decreasing with further increase in input level. At a relatively low threshold setting, the dynamics of some instruments will become inverted for an effect similar to tape being played backwards.


5. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.










Gyratec X


1. Introduction

Gyraf Gyratec X carries the might of a true tube stereo compressor! Widely recognized for its speed, and featuring technology used in early limiters like the coveted Fairchild 670, this Vari-Mu beast from Gyraf Audio comes alive in the FPGA domain! Thanks to its smooth high-pass filtering, it allows hard compression of the low end without dirtying up the sound. The Gyraf Gyratec X is perfect for using along with other types of compressors and Antelope’s growing list of Vintage Effects processors. We are proud to be the first to offer an FPGA replica of this unit!


2. Features

  • True tube Vari-MU compressor.
  • Faster response than electro-optical compressors.
  • No-feedback signal path & pure Class A topology.
  • Warm, musical sound.


3. Layout







1. Input Level Control

Controls the input level for the first variable gain stage – the “drive” for the compressor. To obtain unity gain, set the Input and Output Level controls at their two o’clock positions.

2. Threshold & Ratio Controls

The Threshold control sets the level at which compression sets in. Turning it counter-clockwise selects a lower start point, which brings out more compression. Turned fully clockwise, the control stops compression.

The Ratio knob controls the amount of compression of the signal which exceeds the threshold value. Setting this control fully counter-clockwise deactivates compression.

3. Gain Reduction Meter

Visualizes the gain reduction occuring as the result of compression.

4. Power On/Off Switch

Activates or deactivates the compressor. The gain reduction meter lights up to indicate that the compressor is active. The switch corresponds to the BP button inside the AFX Rack.

5. Attack & Release Controls

The Attack control adjusts the time it takes the compressor to react to a rising input level.

The Release control adjusts the amount of time between the input signal falling below threshold and the compressor returning to unity gain.

6. Output Level Control

Controls the signal level to the output driver stage and the compressor output.

7. Output Level Meter

Visualizes the level of the output signal.


4. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.















FET-A76


1. Introduction

FET-based compression has been a staple in the studio since its invention in the late ’60s. The Antelope Audio FET-A76 captures all the subtleties and nuances of a vintage FET compressor. Just like its analog progenitor, it’s useful not only for controlling dynamics and sculpting tone, but also for its ability to add punch and presence to anything passing through its circuits.

Mirroring the original hardware’s simplified and intuitive interface, the FET-A76 features Input & Output gain controls and a selectable 4-way ratio control with an additional “all-buttons-in” mode for an aggressive compression character.

The FET-A76 shines in a wide range of applications — from vocals, to bass guitar, to bus compression. It’s a powerful companion to Antelope Audio’s FPGA EQ models, such as the BAE-1073 EQ.


2. Features

  • Vintage FET (Field Effect Transistor)-based compression and limiting.
  • Versatile and powerful, suitable for a wide range of instruments and vocals.
  • “All-buttons-in” mode allows drastic and aggressive compression.
  • Simple and intuitive interface.

3. Layout




1. Input Control

Controls the input level for the first variable gain stage – the “drive” for the compressor. To obtain unity gain, set the Input and Output Level controls at their two o’clock positions.

2. Output Control

The Threshold control sets the level at which compression sets in. Turning it counter-clockwise selects a lower start point, which brings out more compression. Turned fully clockwise, the control stops compression.

The Ratio knob controls the amount of compression of the signal which exceeds the threshold value. Setting this control fully counter-clockwise deactivates compression.

3. Attack & Release Controls

Visualizes the gain reduction occuring as the result of compression.

A. THE ATTACK CONTROL

It adjusts the length of time it takes the FET-A76 to respond to a signal and begin gain reduction. The Attack time can vary between 20 microseconds to 800 microseconds. It is at its fastest when the knob is in the fully clockwise position, and slowest when it’s fully counterclockwise.

Turning the Attack knob all the way to the Off position disables compression altogether — although the signal still passes through the FET-A76 and gets “colored” musically.

With fast attack times, gain reduction is engaged almost immediately after the signal reaches the compression threshold. Short transients are caught by the compressor and reduced in level, thus the sound becomes softened. With slower attack times, these transients will pass through unaffected before limiting or compression occurs.

B. RELEASE CONTROL

Adjusts the length of time it takes the compressor to return to its initial level after compressing the signal. The release time is adjustable between 50 milliseconds and 1100 milliseconds (that’s 1.1 seconds). The Release time is at its fastest when the knob is in its fully clockwise position, and slowest when in the fully counterclockwise position.

How to set the Release time? Consider these hints. If the Release time is too fast, “pumping” and “breathing” artifacts may occur. Set it too slow, and loud sections may cause persistent gain reduction throughout soft sections, making them hard to hear.

4. Ratio Buttons

Choose the compression ratio. The available options are 4:1, 8:1, 12:1, and 20:1. At the latter two ratios, the FET-A76 is limiting audio instead of compressing it. Higher ratio settings also set the signal threshold higher.

Hold down Ctrl (or Command on Mac) and click to press multiple ratio buttons and obtain the aggressive “all buttons pushed in” sound — great for beefing up a drum bus or ambiance and room mics with parallel processing, for example.

5. Gain Reduction Meter

Visualizes the gain reduction occurring as the result of compression.

6. Power On/Off Button

Turns the compressor On or bypasses it. The button doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

7. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes the output signal level.



4. Quick Start

  1. Start by setting the Input and Output knobs to their 12 o’clock positions (unity gain).
  2. Set the Attack and Release controls to their 12 o’clock positions (at approximately “4”). Some gain reduction will occur.
  3. Slowly turn the Input control clockwise until the desired amount of gain reduction is achieved.
  4. Adjust the Attack & Release times until they sound suitable for your material.
  5. Raise the Output level to make up for lost gain.



5. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.













FeedForward Compressor


1. Introduction

The Antelope Audio FeedForward Compressor is featured in all our interfaces. It comes with all the necessary controls — Threshold, Ratio, Attack, Release, and Knee. Furthermore, the Detector drop-down menu offers several Peak / RMS sense modes to choose from! The FeedForward Compressor is easy to use, but it gets the job done just right — all while sounding quite like a real hardware unit. Enjoy working with it!


2. Features

  • Threshold, Ratio, Attack, Release, and Knee controls.
  • A choice of Peak / RMS sense modes.
  • Visualized gain and threshold.
  • Sounds like a genuine hardware compressor.


3. Layout





1. Ratio Control

Adjusts the compression ratio.

2. Detector Menu

Lets you choose the detector mode of operation. The available options are: Peak, RMS 20, RMS 50, RMS 100, RMS 150, RMS 200. Try how the different settings sound on your material and stick with the one you like most.

3. Threshold Control

Lets you adjust the signal threshold.

4. Knee Control

Adjusts the compressor knee.

5. Attack Control

Adjusts the compressor attack.

6. Release Control

Adjusts the compressor release.

7. Save, Load, BP Buttons

Provide the following functionality: Save Preset, Load Preset, Bypass compressor

8. Meter

Visualizes gain (green) and threshold (purple).

9. Output Gain Adjustment Fader

Lets you adjust output gain, compensating for lost or excess gain.

10. Gain Reduction and Output Level Meters

Visualize Gain Reduction and Output Level, respectively.



4. Glossary

Attack
Adjusts how quickly the compressor starts to work after the signal exceeds the compression threshold.
Release
Controls how soon the compressor will stop after the signal goes below the compression threshold.
Ratio
Controls how much compression is applied. For example, a 3:1 ratio means that every time the input signal crosses the threshold by 3dB, output signal will be attenuated 1dB.
Threshold
The Threshold is the level above which the compressor considers the signal too loud and starts applying compression.
Knee
Knee and Attack have a lot in common, but they are not the same. Like Attack, Knee controls how the compressor will react once input signal passes the threshold. Hard Attack makes the compressor engage immediately while Soft Knee shapes its attack time to make it slower and smoother.






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EQUALIZERS 





VEQ-55b


1. Introduction

Based on beloved hardware from the ’60s and ’70s, the VEQ-55b features four separate bands with up to 12 dB of boost or cut. The high and low bands offer the option of switching between a bell curve or shelving behavior. The unit’s musicality owes in part to the proportional Q behavior of each band — ranging between a gently sloping Q at more subtle levels of boosting or cutting, and a more aggressive slope at higher levels. Additionally, the adjacent EQ bands offer some overlapping frequency selections for creating complex curves and dialing in the perfect sound. As with all Antelope Audio FPGA models, the tonal characteristics of the vintage circuitry are carefully modeled to impint its rich analog character on your audio.


2. Features

  • Four frequency knobs and Gain knobs.
  • Precise, yet musical analog sound.
  • Switchable filter behavior.


3. Layout






1. High Band & Gain Knobs

A. The High Band knob lets you choose between the following center frequencies:

  • 5kHz
  • 5kHz
  • 7kHz
  • 10kHz
  • 12.5kHz
  • 15kHz
  • 20kHz

B. The Gain knob performs cuts or boosts at up to +/- 12dB

2. HF Shelving/Band Switch

Switches between shelving EQ and band-pass EQ modes for the High and High-Mid frequencies.

3. High-Mid Knob & Gain knob

A. The High-Mid Knob lets you choose among the following center frequencies:

  • 800Hz
  • 1.5kHz
  • 3kHz
  • 5kHz
  • 8kHz
  • 10kHz
  • 12.5kHz

B. The Gain knob performs cuts or boosts at up to +/- 12dB at the selected frequency

4. Low Mid & Gain Knobs

A. Low Mid Knob

The Low Mid Knob lets you choose among the following center frequencies:

  • 75Hz
  • 150Hz
  • 180Hz
  • 240Hz
  • 500Hz
  • 700Hz
  • 1kHz

B. The Gain knob performs cuts or boosts at up to +/- 12dB at the selected frequency

5. Low Frequency Shelving/Band-pass Switch

Switches between shelving EQ and band-pass EQ modes for the Low-Mid and Low frequencies.

6. Low & Gain Knobs

A. The Low Knob lets you choose among the following center frequencies:

  • 30Hz
  • 40Hz
  • 50Hz
  • 100Hz
  • 200Hz
  • 300Hz
  • 400Hz

B. The Gain knob performs cuts or boosts at up to +/- 12dB at the selected frequency

7. Input On/Off Button

Turns the EQ On or Off. When in the Off position, the EQ is bypassed. The button doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.


8. Output Gain Knob

Adjusts output gain from -48dB to +12dB. Used to add or omit gain following the equalization.













VEQ-STU 089









1. Introduction

This EQ is a simple, but powerful tool that comes from the channel strip of a world-renowned mixing console. Dating back from the ’70s, this EQ and the console it came from are still revered for their deep analog sound.
The VEQ-STU 089 is a Pultec-style semi-parametric EQ with 2 variable filters and a Presence knob with its own frequency dial. It offers quite a choice, no matter if you are going for frequency-specific equalizing or into broader tone shaping.

The VEQ-STU 089 and its minimalist, yet effective set of controls will give your sound a warm and authentic analog treatment. It is especially powerful when processing drum sounds — try it!











2. Features

  • Variable low- and high-pass filters.
  • Low- and high-frequency boost & cut sliders.
  • Presence dial with adjustable center frequency.















3. Layout





1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the equalizer On or bypasses it. The LED above lights up in Red to indicate the equalizer works. The switch doubles as the BP button from the AFX Rack.

2. High-Pass Filter Slider

Selects the cutoff frequency for the high-pass filter. The following choices are available:

  • Bypass
  • 60Hz
  • 100Hz
  • 150Hz
  • 250Hz

3. Low-Pass Filter Slider

Selects the cutoff frequency for the low-pass filter. The following choices are available:

Bypass
3kHz
5kHz
8kHz
12kHz

4. Low Boost/Cut Slider

Boosts or cuts audio at 80Hz by up to +/- 8dB.







VEQ-STU 169


1. Introduction

The VEQ-STU 169 is part of a second-generation analog Western European mixing desk. Produced in the late 70s and early 80s, these desks earned their place as top music recording devices with their transparent, yet gently colored analog sound. The simple, yet powerful 3 band inductor-based EQ carries a signature musicality owing to the combination of its high-end smoothness and headroom alongside clean and precise lows.

Designed for broad tone shaping, the VEQ-STU 169 is still used in studios ranging from vintage analog to hi-end digital. Both still take advantage of its unique coloring. With a low-pass filter and a sweepable bell mode mid band, you can surely achieve the sound many other EQs can only dream of. The low frequency band is set to shelve at 60 Hz, the mids are sweepable between 150 Hz & 7 khz, and the high frequency shelving comes at 10 kHz.


2. Features

  • Switchable low-cut filter.
  • Adjustable Low and High shelving equalizers.
  • Sweepable mid-band equalizer.
  • Gentle analog sound.


3. Layout






1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns On the EQ or bypasses it. The switch doubles as the BP button found in the AFX Rack.

2. Low-Cut Filter Switch

Engages or disengages the low-cut filter.

3. Low Band Shelve Knob

Shelves frequencies at 60Hz with up to +/-4dB of gain

4. Mid Band Sweep EQ

This EQ lets you dial in a boost or cut along the entire mid-frequency range with a classic bell shape. The gray knob sweeps the eq from the lowest mids (150Hz) all the way up to the highest mids (7kHz). The red knob lets you adjust the intensity of the boost or cut.

5. High Band Shelve Knob

Shelves frequencies at 10kHz with up to +/- 4dB of gain.

6. Gain Control

Adjusts output gain, letting you make up for excess or lost gain after equalization.

7. Output Level Meter

Visualizes output level.









VEQ-STU 900


1. Introduction

This EQ comes straight from the channel strip of one of the best-sounding analog mixing desks. What makes it special? The VEQ-STU 900 is a very flexible 4-band semi-parametric EQ with cut/boost controls and variable frequencies. Its HF and LF bands support bell and shelf modes, and its LMF and HMF bands have two options for Q.

With this functionality, the VEQ-STU 900 lets you shape the sound in fairly extreme ways without deforming it. With its thick lows and gentle mids, you might like it even more than a comparable Pultec or SSL EQ.


2. Features

  • Four-band semi-parametric EQ.
  • High- and low-pass filters.
  • Warm and musical analog sound.


3. Layout






1. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ On or Off. Also doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. LF Frequency Selector

Selects the low frequency to be boosted or attenuated.

3. Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by +/- 15dB. Use the switch below it to choose between bell or shelving curves.

4. LMF Frequency Selector

Selects the low-mid frequency to be boosted or attenuated.

5. Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by +/- 15dB. Use the switch below it to choose between bell or shelving curves.

6. HMF Frequency Selector

Selects the high-mid frequency to be boosted or attenuated.

7. Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by +/- 15dB. Use the switch below it to choose between bell or shelving curves.

8. HF Frequency Selector

Selects the high-mid frequency to be boosted or attenuated.

9. Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by +/- 15dB. Use the switch below it to choose between bell or shelving curves.

10. High-Pass Filter

Engages the high-pass filter, cutting signal below the chosen frequency.

11. Low-Pass Filter

Engages the low-pass filter, cutting signal above the chosen frequency

12. Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by +12/-24dB.

13. Output Level Meter

Visualizes output gain.



4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.

4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.

4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.













VEQ HA32C


1. Introduction

The VEQ HA32C was inspired by one of the richest and most characteristic-sounding four-band channel EQ modules. Incredibly versatile, it can treat everything — including vocals, bass & electric guitars, and drums. The EQ smooths out the high-end while keeping the mids vivid and the lows thick and solid. It features four parametric bands, each of them coming with a Gain and Frequency control knob. The Low and High bands can be switched to shelving modes, and the EQ features High- and Low-Pass filters that can be switched on or off.


2. Features

  • Switchable low-and high-pass filters.
  • Switchable low and high frequency shelving.
  • Four semi-parametric bands.


3. Layout





1. High Pass Frequency Knob

Selects the high-pass filter frequency.

2. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ On or Off. The button doubles as the Bypass button from the AFX Rack.

3. HP IN Button

Turns the high-pass filter On or Off.

4. Low Pass Frequency Knob

Selects the low-pass filter frequency.

5. LP IN Button

Turns the low-pass filter On or Off.

6. Low Frequency Knob

Selects the low center frequency. Use the shelving switch below to engage shelving EQ mode.

7. Low Frequency Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the selected low frequency from -10 to +10dB.

8. Low Mid Frequency Knob

Selects the low mid center frequency.

9. Low Mid Frequency Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the selected low mid frequency from -10 to +10dB.

10. High Mid Frequency Knob

Selects the high mid center frequency.

11. High Mid Frequency Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the selected high mid frequency from -10 to +10dB.

12. High Frequency Knob

Selects the high center frequency. Use the shelving switch below to engage shelving EQ mode.

13. High Frequency Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the selected high mid frequency from -10 to +10dB.

14. Output Gain Knob

Adjusts output gain from +12dB to -24dB. This lets you make up for lost gain or attenuate the excess.



4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.

4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.

4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.











BAE 1023


1. Introduction

Ever felt like the BAE 1073 sounded ace but didn’t offer enough control? Well, BAE 1023 is here to save the day! It offers five more frequencies in the mids and four in the high range. This, however, isn’t the sole change here.

The EQ offers even more tone shaping options — for example, it lets you use the mid-bell curve directly against the low & high shelving EQs where they overlap. This results in a very organic analog sound. High frequencies can be boost or cut in shelving mode, and the mids are EQ’d in peaking mode.

Below’s a list with the expanded frequency controls of the 1023. The high pass filter works on 18dB per octave slope and is switchable between 45Hz, 70Hz, 160Hz and 360Hz.
Lows: +/-16dB at 35Hz, 60Hz, 110Hz & 220Hz.
Mids: +/-12dB or +/-18dB at 160Hz, 270Hz, 360Hz, 510Hz, 700Hz, 1.6k, 3.2k, 4.8k, 7.2k, 8.2k and 10kHz.
Highs: +/-16dB at 10kHz, 12kHz, 16kHz, 20kHz and 24kHz.


2. Features

  • Phase flip.
  • Low-cut filter.
  • Two shelving EQs (Low & High frequencies).
  • One peak EQ (Mid frequencies).


3. Layout





1. Phase Flip Button

Flips the phase 180 degrees

2. EQ On/Off Button

Turns the EQ On and Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

3. Low-cut Filter Knob

Engages or bypasses the low-cut filter. The following fixed frequencies are available:

50Hz
80Hz
160Hz
300Hz

4. Low Shelving EQ Knobs

Use the smaller gray knob to dial in a boost (clockwise) or cut (counter-clockwise).

Use the circular knob around it to bypass the filter (in the Off position) or to select one of the following frequencies:

35Hz
60Hz
110Hz
220Hz

5. Mid Band EQ Knobs

Use the smaller gray knob to dial in a boost (clockwise) or cut (counter-clockwise).

Use the circular gray knob around it to bypass the filter (in the Off position) or to select one of the following frequencies:

160Hz
270Hz
360Hz
510Hz
700Hz
1.6kHz
3.2kHz
4.8kHz
7.2kHz
8.2kHz
10kHz

6. High Shelving EQ Knobs

Use the smaller gray knob to dial in a boost (clockwise) or cut (counter-clockwise).

Use the circular gray knob around it to bypass the filter (in the Off position) or to select one of the following frequencies:

10kHz
12kHz
16kHz
20kHz
24kHz

7. Gain Knob

Compensates for lost or excess gain as a result of equalization.

8. Output Level Meter

Visualizes output gain.




4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.

4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.

4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.















BAE 1084


1. Introduction

An authentic FPGA model of a vintage console channel strip EQ, the BAE 1084 is one of the most precise and versatile EQs you can ever get your hands onto. The EQ is a synonym for fat large sound with massive lows and a smooth high end. Its original analog design, which we’ve recreated, offers extended control over the sound spectre.

Tone shaping is brought to a whole new level and what you’ve so far considered tiny tweaks now result in unprecedented all-analog sonic detail. Try boosting at 220Hz – it won’t result in any mud in your sound! The BAE 1084 also offers a Hi-Q button for a narrowing of the mid-band.

The EQ features a four-frequency high pass filter – 45Hz, 70Hz, 160Hz, 360Hz and a five frequencies low-pass filter – 6kHz, 8kHz, 10kHz, 14kHz and 18kHz. The mid band features six frequencies – 350Hz, 700Hz, 1.6kHz, 3.2kHz, 4.8kHz and 7.2kHz. The high band works in shelving mode and has three frequencies — 10kHz, 12kHz and 16kHz.


2. Features

  • Signal phase flip.
  • Combined low and high-pass filter with adjustable frequencies.
  • Low shelving EQ.
  • Mid band EQ with optional High Q mode.
  • High shelving EQ.
  • Adjustable gain.


3. Layout





1. Phase Flip Button

Flips the signal phase 180 degrees.

2. EQ On/Off Button

Turns the EQ on or bypasses it. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

3. Combined Low- and High-pass Filter

Use the circular knob to choose a frequency for the high-pass filter.
Use the smaller knob to choose a frequency for the low-pass filter.

4. Low Shelving EQ

Use the circular knob to choose a frequency for the low shelving EQ.
Use the smaller knob to perform a boost or cut at the selected frequency.

5. Mid Band EQ

Use the circular knob to choose a frequency for the mid band EQ.
Use the smaller knob to perform a boost or cut at the selected frequency.

6. HIQ Button

Activates or disables the high Q mode for the mid band knob.

7. High Shelving EQ

Use the circular knob to choose a frequency for the high shelving EQ.
Use the smaller knob to perform a boost or cut at the selected frequency.

8. Gain Knob

Add lost gain back or reduce excess occuring as the result of equalization.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.















NEU-W942


1. Introduction

The NEU-W492 is based on the inimitable circuitry design of the original, carrying its signature German sound. As a favorite mastering tool of generations of record producers and sound engineers, the unit features a 4-band EQ with bypass available for each band or the entire unit. Versatile and simple to use, the NEU-W492 is particularly powerful in the midrange, delivering a warm analog sound character.


2. Features

  • Low-cut filter.
  • Two shelving EQs.
  • Two Peak EQs.
  • Bypass for each of the four bands.


3. Layout






1. On/Off Switch

Turns the EQ On or bypasses it. The switch doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. High-Pass Filter Switch

Chooses the high-pass filter frequency from 80Hz, 20Hz, and 120Hz.

3. Low Shelving EQ Gain Knob

Adds or reduces gain from -15dB to +15dB.

4. Low Shelving EQ

Chooses the center frequency for the low shelving EQ. The following choices are available:

0.05kHz (50Hz)
0.055kHz (55Hz)
0.065kHz (65Hz)
0.125kHz (125Hz)
0.2kHz (200Hz)
0.4kHz (400Hz)

Use the On and Off switch to enable or disable this EQ section.

5. Low Mid Peak EQ Gain Knob

Adds or reduces gain from -15dB to +15dB.

6. Low Mid Peak EQ Frequency Knob

Chooses the center frequency for the low mid peak EQ. The following choices are available:

0.06kHz (60Hz)
0.12kHz (120Hz)
0.2kHz (200Hz)
0.25kHz (250Hz)
0.35kHz (350Hz)
0.6kHz (600Hz)
1kHz (1000Hz)

Use the On and Off switch to enable or disable this EQ section.

7. Mid High Peak EQ Gain Knob

Adds or reduces gain from -15dB to +15dB.

8. Mid High Peak EQ Frequency Knob

Chooses the center frequency for the mid high peak EQ. The following choices are available:

1kHz
2kHz
3Khz
4.5kHz
6kHz
10kHz
16kHz

Use the On and Off switch to enable or disable this EQ section.

9. High Shelving EQ Gain Knob

Adds or reduces gain from -15dB to +15dB.

10. High Shelving EQ Frequency Knob

Chooses the center frequency for the high shelving EQ. The following choices are available:

3kHz
3.3kHz
3.7kHz
4.5kHz
5.5kHz
7.5kHz
10kHz

Use the On and Off switch to enable or disable this EQ section.

11. Gain Knob

Adds lost gain or reduces excess occuring as the result of compression. Ranges from -24 to +12dB.

12. Output Level Meter

Visualizes output level.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.















NEU-PEV


1. Introduction

The NEU-PEV EQ is modeled on a rare German passive equalizer designed in the 60s. Its simple interface belies the complex tonal possibilities achievable with its four main knobs. A low shelving filter is fixed at 60Hz and can apply a boost or cut.

The “Presence” section offers up to 8 dB of boost for one of 7 selectable frequencies between 700 Hz and 5.6 kHz, while a 10kHz high shelf allows boost or cut at the top end of the frequency spectrum. An on-off switch and output gain control provide users with even more utility.

Notable for its warmth and spacious midrange, the NEU-PEV makes some of the most compelling sounds of both yesterday and today achievable without a massive rack of aging vintage gear!


2. Features

  • 60Hz low shelving filter.
  • Two shelving EQs.
  • Presence filter with selectable frequencies.
  • 10kHz high shelf filter.


3. Layout





1. On/Off Switch

Turns the EQ On or bypasses it. The switch doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

2. 60Hz Low Shelving EQ

Applies a cut of up to -15dB or boost of up to 9dB at 60Hz.

3. Presence Boost Knob

Applies a presence boost of up to 8dB.

4. Frequency Select Knob

Chooses a frequency for the presence boost. The following choices are available:

0.7kHz
1kHz
1.4kHz
2kHz
2.8kHz
4kHz
5.6kHz

5. High Shelving EQ Knob

Applies a cut of up to -15dB or boost of up to 9dB at 10kHz.

6. Output Gain Knob

Boosts or attenuates the signal by up to +12/-24dB. You can make up for lost gain or remove excess gain which occur as the result of equalization.

7. Output Level Meter

Visualizes output gain.



4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.












VEQ-4K Series


1. Introduction

Having imparted its sound signature on generations of artists and hit recordings for more than 50 years, the VEQ-4K series are based on a rock-solid analog design — now brought to life in Antelope’s FPGA FX modules.
The Antelope VEQ-4K series is complete with four different-colored hardware-original revisions, each delivering its own unique sound shaping characteristics. The revisions are Black, Brown, Pink, and Orange. This manual will deal with all four versions.


2. VEQ-4K Black

Likely the most popular version of the EQ module, this unit was designed following the recommendations of many of the world’s top engineers. The ‘original black’ has a louder EQ with +-18dB cut/boost and a steeper High Pass cut off slope (18db).

Features

  • Low Frequency, Low-Mid Frequency, High-Mid Frequency, High Frequency bands
  • Low- and high-pass filters
  • Optional bell curve for the Low Frequency band



Layout




1. Bell On/Off Button

Turns the bell curve for the Low Frequency bands On or Off

2. Low Band Gain Knob

Adjusts gain from -15 to +15dB.

3. Low Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low band frequency. The following choices are available:

30Hz
50Hz
100Hz
200Hz
300Hz
450Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

4. Low-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

5. Low-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
800Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
2.5kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

6. Low-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band filter gain. Ranges from -15dB to +15dB.

7. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ on or bypasses it. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

8. High-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

9. High-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

600Hz
700Hz
1.5kHz
3kHz
4.5kHz
6kHz
7kHz

10. High-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

11. High Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high band frequency. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
5kHz
8kHz
10kHz
14kHz
16kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

12. High Band Gain Knob

Adjusts high band filter gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

13. Bell Button

Turns the high band bell curve on and off.

14. High-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the high-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

20Hz
70Hz
120Hz
200Hz
300Hz
350Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

15. Low-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the low-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

12kHz
8kHz
5kHz
4kHz
3.5kHz
3kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

16. Gain Knob

Lets you make up for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization.

17. Output Volume Knob

Visualizes output gain.









3. VEQ-4K Brown

The first model in this legendary line of EQ modules, it remains a classic and still in use by many engineers. It has 4 bands with a sweepable mid Q. The HF and LF can be switched to Bell/Shelf modes with a degree of boost/cut by +/- 15db.







Features

  • Low, Low-Mid, High-Mid, High frequency bands
  • High- and low-pass filters
  • Switchable bell curves for the low and high frequency bands


Layout







1. Bell On/Off Button

Turns the bell curve for the Low Frequency bands On or Off

2. Low Band Gain Knob

Adjusts gain from -15 to +15dB.

3. Low Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low band frequency. The following choices are available:

30Hz
50Hz
100Hz
200Hz
300Hz
450Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

4. Low-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

5. Low-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
800Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
2.5kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

6. Low-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band filter gain. Ranges from -15dB to +15dB.

7. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ on or bypasses it. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

8. High-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

9. High-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

600Hz
700Hz
1.5kHz
3kHz
4.5kHz
6kHz
7kHz

10. High-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

11. High Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high band frequency. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
5kHz
8kHz
10kHz
14kHz
16kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

12. High Band Gain Knob

Adjusts high band filter gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

13. Bell Button

Turns the high band bell curve on and off.

14. High-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the high-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

20Hz
70Hz
120Hz
200Hz
300Hz
350Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

15. Low-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the low-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

12kHz
8kHz
5kHz
4kHz
3.5kHz
3kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

16. Gain Knob

Lets you make up for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization.

17. Output Volume Knob

Visualizes output gain.



4. VEQ-4K Pink

Originally appearing in the late 80s and with proportional gain settings, the VEQ-4K features shelving HF & LF EQs with a signature combo of dip and bump right before the shelf boost and cut. The Pink module has a wider frequency range with the boost/cut and gain range above +/- 20dB.



Features

  • LMF -3 and HMF x 3 buttons
  • Low Frequency, Low-Mid Frequency, High-Mid Frequency, High Frequency bands
  • High- and low-pass filters

Layout





1. Bell On/Off Button

Turns the bell curve for the Low Frequency bands On or Off

2. Low Band Gain Knob

Adjusts gain from -15 to +15dB.

3. Low Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low band frequency. The following choices are available:

30Hz
50Hz
100Hz
200Hz
300Hz
450Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

4. Low-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

5. Low-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
800Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
2.5kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

6. Low-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band filter gain. Ranges from -15dB to +15dB.

7. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ on or bypasses it. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

8. High-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

9. High-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

600Hz
700Hz
1.5kHz
3kHz
4.5kHz
6kHz
7kHz

10. High-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

11. High Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high band frequency. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
5kHz
8kHz
10kHz
14kHz
16kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

12. High Band Gain Knob

Adjusts high band filter gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

13. Bell Button

Turns the high band bell curve on and off.

14. High-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the high-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

20Hz
70Hz
120Hz
200Hz
300Hz
350Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

15. Low-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the low-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

12kHz
8kHz
5kHz
4kHz
3.5kHz
3kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

16. Gain Knob

Lets you make up for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization.

17. Output Volume Knob

Visualizes output gain.




5. VEQ 4K-Orange

A variation on the VEQ-4k Brown, which’s still a huge thing in Japan. Very close as sound to a Pultec EQ and with controls simulating valve EQ curves. This one is not just one more module strip revision, but a hardware rarity with a sound of its own.



Features

  • LMF -3 and HMF x 3 buttons
  • Low Frequency, Low-Mid Frequency, High-Mid Frequency, High Frequency bands
  • High- and low-pass filters


Layout




1. Bell On/Off Button

Turns the bell curve for the Low Frequency bands On or Off

2. Low Band Gain Knob

Adjusts gain from -15 to +15dB.

3. Low Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low band frequency. The following choices are available:

30Hz
50Hz
100Hz
200Hz
300Hz
450Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

4. Low-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

5. Low-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
800Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
2.5kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

6. Low-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the low-mid band filter gain. Ranges from -15dB to +15dB.

7. Power On/Off Button

Turns the EQ on or bypasses it. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

8. High-Mid Band Q Knob

Adjusts the width of the filter (Q).

9. High-Mid Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band frequency. The following choices are available:

600Hz
700Hz
1.5kHz
3kHz
4.5kHz
6kHz
7kHz

10. High-Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts the high-mid band gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

11. High Band Frequency Knob

Adjusts the high band frequency. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
5kHz
8kHz
10kHz
14kHz
16kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

12. High Band Gain Knob

Adjusts high band filter gain. Ranges between -15dB to +15dB.

13. Bell Button

Turns the high band bell curve on and off.

14. High-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the high-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

20Hz
70Hz
120Hz
200Hz
300Hz
350Hz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

15. Low-Pass Filter Knob

Adjusts the low-pass filter frequency. The following choices are available:

12kHz
8kHz
5kHz
4kHz
3.5kHz
3kHz

Intermittent frequencies are also available as the knob is variable.

16. Gain Knob

Lets you make up for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization.

17. Output Volume Knob

Visualizes output gain.



6. Glossary

6.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
6.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
6.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.











BAE 1073


1. Introduction

Born in the ’70s, this channel EQ module has been surely used on all your favorite records. The BAE 1073 can handle it all – from classical music to pop, badass hip-hop and rock. Inspired by the hardware original, we made sure this beast can give your sound that very specific analog punch, which top producers have been cashing in on for decades now!


2. Features

  • High-pass filter (50Hz, 80Hz, 100Hz, 300Hz).
  • Low-band shelving EQ (35Hz, 60Hz, 110Hz, 220Hz).
  • Mid band EQ (160Hz, 270Hz, 360Hz, 510Hz, 700Hz, 1.6kHz, 3.2kHz, 4.8 kHz, 7.2kHz, 8.2kHz, 10kHz).
  • High-band shelving EQ (10kHz, 12kHz, 16kHz, 20kHz, 24kHz).
  • Line Output Control

3. Layout





1. Phase Flip Button

Flips the signal phase. Use it to correct phasing problems, such as lack of bass or things soundling like they are ran through a phaser.

2. Power On/Off Button

When lit, the equalizer is turned On. When not lit, the EQ is bypassed. The button doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

3. Low Cut Switch

Low-cut filter ranging from 50Hz to 300Hz.

4. Low-Frequency Filter

+/-16dB shelving with selectable frequencies of 35Hz, 60Hz, 110Hz & 220Hz

5. Mid-Frequency Filter

+/-18dB peaking, fixed ‘Q’ with, selectable centre frequencies of 0.36kHz, 0.7kHz, 1.6kHz, 3.2kHz, 4.8kHz & 7.2kHz

6. High-Frequency Filter

+/-16dB fixed frequency shelving at 12kHz

7. Gain Control

Ranges from 0dB to 80dB.

8. Output Monitor

Visualizes output signal.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.









VEQ-HLF


1. Introduction

Pultec’s simple and effective filter features two knobs: one each for passive low-cut and high-cut filters at carefully selected frequency intervals. With 10 frequency selections available per band, it is the perfect tool for creating space in your mix by eliminating unneeded frequencies at the extremes of the audio spectrum — while ensuring a musical analog tone.
Even if you don’t intend to use the cutoff filters, try inserting the VEQ-HLF in your processing chain to obtain its peculiar and highly sought-after sound coloration.


2. Features

  • Low and high cut-off filters
  • Simple and intuitive use
  • Musical analog tone

3. Layout





1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the filter On or Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

2. Low Cut-Off Filter Knob

Adjusts the low cut-off filter frequency. The following choices are available:

Off (bypass)
50Hz
80Hz
100Hz
150Hz
250Hz
500Hz
750Hz
1000Hz
1500Hz
2000Hz

3. High Cut-Off Filter Knob

Adjusts the high cut-off filter frequency. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
3kHz
4kHz
5kHz
6kHz
8kHz
10kHz
12kHz
15kHz
Off (bypass)

4. Power On/Off Light

Lights up when the filter is On.

5. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.



4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.












VEQ-1A


1. Introduction

You’re surely into studio legends if you’re reading this, so let’s take you back 60 years ago when a tube legend was born to become a part of every pro studio in the world. VEQ – 1A is not only breathing a new life into a classic, but sounds as thick as the real piece and it does hide quite a few tricks. For example simultaneous cut and boost of the same frequency, which gives the sound a unique quality you can’t really get with another EQ. Massive bass, gentle highs and richness – these knobs surely do some analog magic!


2. Features

  • Simultaneous boost & cut of selected frequencies
  • Attenuation selector
  • Bandwidth (Q) adjustment knob

3. Layout



1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the VEQ-1A On or Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

2. Low Band Boost Knob

Boosts the low band at the selected target frequency.

3. Low Band Frequency Select Knob

Chooses the target frequency for the low band. The following options are available:

20Hz
30Hz
60Hz
100Hz

4. Low Band Attenuate Knob

Attenuates the low band at the selected target frequency.

5. Bandwidth Knob

Adjusts the band width for both filters without altering any of the other parameters.

6. High Band Boost Knob

Attenuates the low band at the selected target frequency.

7. High Band Frequency Select Knob

Chooses the target frequency for the high band. The following options are available:

3kHz
4kHz
5kHz
8kHz
10kHz
12kHz
16kHz

8. High Band Attenuate Knob

Attenuates the high band at the chosen target frequency.

9. Attenuation Selector

Chooses the attenuation amount — 5dB, 10dB, or 20dB

10. Power On/Off Light

Lights up when the EQ is active.

11. Output Gain Knob

Visualizes output gain.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.











VMEQ-5


1. Introduction

What’s proper low- and high-end with no guts in the mids? VMEQ-5 is mid range’s best friend! Two peak bands and a dip band are all you need to give your vocals, synth, guitar leads or snare drum the analog punch they’ve always needed. This little beast can also clean up a murky midrange like a boss!


2. Features

  • Two peak bands and one dip band
  • Optimized for mid-range frequencies
  • Punchy analog sound


3. Layout




1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the EQ On or Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. Low-Mid Peak Band Frequency Select

Chooses the low peak band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
500Hz
700Hz
1000Hz

3. Low Peak Band Gain Knob

Adjusts low peak band gain.

4. Mid-Range Dip Frequency Knob

Adjusts the mid-range dip frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
500Hz
700Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
3kHz
4kHz
5kHz
7kHz

5. Mid-Range Dip Gain Knob

Adjusts mid-range dip gain.

6. High Mid-Band Frequency Select Knob

Chooses a frequency for the high-mid band. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
3kHz
4kHz
5kHz

7. High Mid-Band Dip Gain Knob

Adjusts high mid-band dip gain.

8. Power On/Off Indicator

Lights up when the EQ is turned On.

9 Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.

4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.

4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.











VEQ-55A


1. Introduction

Having issues getting your bass guitar sound edgy enough? Need some meat in your drums or maybe some body in the guitars? Problem solved, VEQ-55A will emphasize all the tiny details your mix has been missing. All that, which has been causing troubles will be gently cut.


2. Features

  • High, mid, and low frequency bands
  • Switchable low/high-pass filter
  • Input On/Off switch

3. Layout


1. High Frequency Band

Use the purple knob to choose a target frequency. Use the gray knob to adjust gain.

The following frequencies are available:

5kHz
7kHz
10kHz
12.5kHz
15kHz

The gain knob ranges between -12dB to +12dB.

2. Mid Frequency Band

Use the purple knob to choose a target frequency. Use the gray knob to adjust gain.

The following frequencies are available:

400Hz
800Hz
1.5kHz
3kHz
5kHz

The gain knob ranges between -12dB to +12dB.

3. Low Frequency Band

Use the purple knob to choose a target frequency. Use the gray knob to adjust gain.

The following frequencies are available:

50Hz
100Hz
200Hz
300Hz
400Hz

The gain knob ranges between -12dB to +12dB.

4. Low Cut Filter Switch

Engages the low-cut filter.

5. Filter On/Off Switch

Turns the filter On or Off.

6. High Cut Filter Switch

Engages the high cut filter.

7. Input On/Off Switch

Turns input signal On or Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

8. Output Gain Knob

Adjusts output gain. Lets you make up for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization.

9. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.











PEQ2


1. Introduction

The PEQ2 is modeled after a vintage solid-state parametric EQ. Yes, it’s actually a pumped-up 1960s Pultec. Featuring controls similar to the VEQ-1A tube EQ, the PEQ2 stands apart from the pack with its frequency control that lets users set separate LF boost and LF cut frequencies.

PEQ2 provides plenty of width in the mid range while retaining tightness on the high end and low end. Its high end bands excel at giving tracks that extra shine, making it an all-star on vocals and drum overheads.


2. Features

  • Boost & droop frequency knobs
  • Frequency selectors
  • HF boost bandwidth

3. Layout





1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the EQ on or off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

2. Power On/Off Indicator

Lights up when the EQ is active.

3. LF Boost Frequency Select Knob

Selects the frequency for low boost. The following choices are available:

20Hz
30Hz
40Hz
60Hz
80Hz
120Hz
160Hz
240Hz

4. LF Boost Gain Knob

Adjusts LF boost gain.

5. LF Droop Gain Knob

Adjusts LF droop gain.

6. LF Droop Frequency Select Knob

Selects the LF droop target frequency. The following choices are available:

25Hz
50Hz
100Hz
200Hz

7. High Frequency Boost Bandwidth Knob

Adjusts the high frequency boost bandwidth. Goes from ‘sharp’ to ‘broad’.

8. High Frequency Boost Knob

Chooses the target frequency for the high frequency boost. The following choices are available:

2.5kHz
3.75kHz
5kHz
7.5kHz
10kHz
12kHz
15kHz
20kHz

9. High Frequency Boost Gain Knob

Adjusts high frequency boost gain.

10. HF Droop Gain Knob

Adjusts HF droop gain.

11. HF Droop Frequency Select Knob

Chooses the HF Droop target frequency. The following choices are available:

2.5kHz
5kHz
7.5kHz
10kHz
15kHz
20kHz

12. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.

13. Output Gain Knob

Adjusts output gain. Ranges between -24dB to +12dB.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.












UK-69


1. Introduction

Modeled on a classic British console EQ used in recordings by well-known artists like The Beatles and Led Zeppelin, the UK-69 adds astonishing detail to your audio. It allows Antelope Audio users to achieve depth and texture formerly the sole territory of standalone hardware.

The bass band is a stepped 50 Hz shelf filter or frequency selectable peak EQ, the treble band is a fixed 10 kHz shelf EQ, and the mid section sports a frequency-selectable peak or notch EQ with 8 frequencies available. The control panel is rounded out with a level knob and EQ bypass buttons.

This EQ is notable for its ability to preserve transparency while adding space and presence. Antelope Audio’s model of this highly coveted circuit delivers unprecedented authenticity!


2. Features

  • Bass, Mid, and Treble bands
  • Selectable bass band frequencies
  • Fixed 10kHz treble band

3. Layout





1. EQ Cut Switch On/Off

Engages or disengages the equalizer. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX rack.

2. Bass Band Frequency Select Knob

Selects the bass band frequency. The following choices are available:

400Hz
240Hz
120Hz
60Hz
30Hz
0Hz
3kHz
6kHz
9kHz
12kHz
15kHz

3. Bass Band Gain Knob

Adjusts bass band gain.

4. Mid Band Frequency Select Knob

Chooses the target frequency for the mid-band. The following choices are available:

700Hz
1kHz
1.4kHz
2kHz
2.8kHz
3.5kHz
4.5kHz
6kHz
8kHz

5. Mid Band Gain Knob

Adjusts mid band gain.

6. Peak/Through Switch

Switches the EQ between peak (PK) and notch (TR) filtering.

7. Treble Band Gain Knob

Adjusts gain at the treble band, which is fixed at 10kHz.

8. Line Level Gain Knob

Adjusts the EQ’s output volume. You can compensate for lost gain or dial out the excess occuring as the result of equalization. The knob ranges between +12dB to -24dB.

9. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.



4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.







Parametric EQ


1. Introduction

Antelope Audio’s integrated EQ offers 5 fully parametric bands. Two of those can work in filter or shelving mode, and the three in the middle can cut or boost selected frequency ranges. Our users have been using this simply designed, yet perfect-sounding plug-in for both tracking and mixing, as it provides all that you might need in an EQ.


2. Features

  • Five parametric bands with selectable frequencies
  • Five gain adjustment knobs
  • Five Q width adjustment knobs
  • Graphic display
  • Output gain meter


3. Layout



1. Frequency Adjustment Knobs

Specify up to five frequency bands for equalization.

2. Gain Adjustment Knobs

Specify the amount of gain applied to a particular band.

3. Q Width Adjustment Knobs

Specify the Q width of a particular band.

4. Graphic Display

Visualizes the equalization curves.

5. Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.


4. Glossary

4.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.
4.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.
4.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.










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Mic Emulation Panels










Mic Emulation panel for Verge




The Panel explained

When you load a Mic Emulation for Verge, the following screen will pop up.




Verge emulations




Note: 48V Phantom power will be automatically enabled.




The following controls are available on the pop-up window:






Phase invert – allows you to invert the polar pattern of the signal in the selected Mic input.






Phantom power switch – by default switched on when you’re loading a Mic Emulation in the Discrete 4 and Discrete 8 Control Panel.







Verge Edge emulations select

Mode switch – allows you to switch between Verge, Edge or turn the emulation off.







Verge emulations select

Emulation select – here you can choose the exact model of the mic you wish to emulate. For the moment available are the following: Berlin 184, Perth 55, Freiburg 6, Aalborg 4006, Hamburg 40 and more will be released very soon.









Mic Emulation panel for Edge




The Panel explained

When you load a Mic Emulation for Edge, the following screen will pop up.





Note: 48V Phantom power will be automatically enabled.








The following controls are available on the pop-up window:









Phase invert – allows you to invert the polar pattern of the signal in the selected Mic input.










Phantom power switch – by default switched on when you’re loading a Mic Emulation in the Discrete 4 and Discrete 8 Control Panel.














Mode switch – allows you to switch between Verge, Edge or turn the emulation off.










Channel swap – this function is Edge exclusive since it uses two inputs. It allows you to switch the channels order F-B (L-R) or B-F (R-L).










Emulation select – here you can choose the exact model of the mic you wish to emulate. For the moment available are the following: Berlin 47 FT, Berlin 87, Berlin 67, Tokyo 800T and more will be released very soon.










Pattern selector – only active if the microphone has 












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REVERBS





AuraVerb


1. Introduction

AuraVerb is the first Antelope Audio reverb. The software-based effect leverages Antelope Audio’s powerful 64-bit processing and features unique algorithms designed by Antelope’s team of mathematicians, including company founder Igor Levin.

AuraVerb provides richness and color using a special new approach and an unique algorithm. The reverb features eight different controls including a ‘Color’ parameter to create everything between darkened textures to bright, sizzling presence; and a ‘Richness’ parameter that controls the reverb density.

Five-time GRAMMY Award winning recording/mixing engineer Brian ‘Dr. Vibb’ Vibberts was ‘on duty’, working close with Antelope’s development team. Strictly following the doctor’s ‘prescriptions’ the developers came up with a software reverb that users already compare to legendary hardware FX.

In addition to lending his expertise in development, Brian Vibberts shared his know-how by creating 24-custom presets, available to the end-user at the touch of a button. The presets fit various situations and genres of music, making the use of AuraVerb a breeze for both established and relatively inexperienced engineers.

Among other controls present on AuraVerb are Pre-Delay, Early Reflection and Late Delay, which establish the desired amount of ambience for each sound in the mix. By adjusting these and other paramaters present on AuraVerb, users can design thickening & ‘washing effects, bright halo-type film score effects, darkened mood effects and long, smooth, rich decays. Users can also start with any of the 25 paramaters and adapt these to create customized sounds, as well as create and share their own presets.

2. Features

  • Runs in real time on Antelope’s proprietary engine.
  • 24 custom presets created by Grammy-winning producers Brian Vibberts for various instruments and styles.
  • ‘Color’ and ‘Richness’ parameters enable users to control different textures and densities.
  • PreDelay can delay the onset of reverb by up to 150ms.
  • Long and smooth decays feature no digital artifacts.
  • Create your own presets and share them with other AuraVerb users.

3. AuraVerb Parameters





Color

AuraVerb’s Color control allows you to adjust the overall tone of the reverb. On “0” the space created is darker, like a lushly carpeted area. At “100” the reverb is at its brightest, which can add some ‘sizzle’ to a lead vocal, for example.




PreDelay

Common on most reverbs, the predelay allows you to create a bit of space between the source and the onset of reverb. This happens by controlling the amount of delay time that precedes the initial sound from the reverb. This parameter is used to place the reverberated signal later in time with respect to the unprocessed signal.

Natural settings for this are based on the size of the environment and range from 0 to 32 milliseconds. Fine adjustment of this parameter with respect to the tempo of the song or dramatic timing of the piece can help set the feel of the reverb within the mix.




Early Reflection Gain

This is the linear gain value for all early reflections. These reflections are perceptually grouped with the direct sound when set at lower levels, and can nicely thicken a track when increased.







Late Reflection Delay

Among other things, AuraVerb calculates reflected energy from the side walls and ceiling of the virtual space. Late Reflection Delay controls the delay of these bursts of reflections, either creating echoes or supporting the spatial impression of the simulated acoustic space.






Richness

Richness controls the complexity of the reverb envelopment and dampening nuances. At “0” there is less dampening and a brighter decay. This sound is light or airy, but by increasing the Richness, you can add a sense of spaciousness to the sound and smoothly increase reverb time for lower frequencies.







Reverb Time & Room Size

Reverb Time controls the length of decay, while Room Size increases the virtual space dimensions and is indicated in meters. Reverb Time is the duration of the reverberant tail for the current Room Size. The perceived decay time will also be affected by Richness and Color with sources with a lot of high frequency content. In general, as the size of the space increases, the Reverb Time will also increase. Setting Reverb Time to 50% gives a natural sounding tail for all room sizes. Interesting big spaces or subtle ambience reverbs can be created by setting Reverb Time unusually high or low with respect to the Room Size parameter.





Reverb Level

This is the output level control of the reverb. The input for AuraVerb is assigned to send controls on the mixer’s individual channels. We recommend that the level of the Reverb is set by the send levels of your interface’s mixer channels. After send levels are adjusted, Output Level is used as master return level to the interface’s stereo master channel.






Preset Manager

The Preset Manager lets you save and load presets. Use the drop-down menu to select a preset. Use the ‘S’ button to save a preset. Use the ‘L’ button to load a preset. You will also notice a visualizer for the Room Size parameter, as well as Input and Output Level meters.